Hey names Kenrick everyone who's anyone calls me rock. vh45 s13. ka24de s13. florida. 24 trips around the sun. currently traveling through space and time. i'm not exactly sure what i would call this. i suppose just a collection of my thoughts likes desires ambitions accomplishments idk you figure it out and when you do tell me, as i am still in search of the answers of our universe. feel free to speak your mind.
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venuseffect:

The Venus Transit

venuseffect:

The Venus Transit

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thre3dprint:

DIY Open-source tattoos with a Makerbot.

thre3dprint:

DIY Open-source tattoos with a Makerbot.

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baked-design:

MakerBot Replicator 2 3D Printer

Price: $2,199 

If sexy were ever realized in printing this would be it. The Replicator 2’s sleek steel frame prints at 100-micron layer resolution using renewable bioplastic material. 

Buy

Link

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amjayes:

Björn vs. Hannu.

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laboratoryequipment:

Monkey Caloric Restriction Study Contradicts Earlier ResultsThe latest results from a 25-year study of diet and aging in monkeys shows a significant reduction in mortality and in age-associated diseases among those with calorie-restricted diets. The study, begun at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989, is one of two ongoing, long-term U.S. efforts to examine the effects of a reduced-calorie diet on nonhuman primates.The study of 76 rhesus monkeys, reported in Nature Communications, was performed at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center in Madison. When they were seven to 14 years of age, the monkeys began eating a diet reduced in calories by 30 percent. The comparison monkeys, which ate as much as they wanted, had an increased risk of disease 2.9 times that of the calorie-restricted group, and a threefold increased risk of death.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/monkey-caloric-restriction-study-contradicts-earlier-results

laboratoryequipment:

Monkey Caloric Restriction Study Contradicts Earlier Results

The latest results from a 25-year study of diet and aging in monkeys shows a significant reduction in mortality and in age-associated diseases among those with calorie-restricted diets. The study, begun at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989, is one of two ongoing, long-term U.S. efforts to examine the effects of a reduced-calorie diet on nonhuman primates.

The study of 76 rhesus monkeys, reported in Nature Communications, was performed at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center in Madison. When they were seven to 14 years of age, the monkeys began eating a diet reduced in calories by 30 percent. The comparison monkeys, which ate as much as they wanted, had an increased risk of disease 2.9 times that of the calorie-restricted group, and a threefold increased risk of death.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/monkey-caloric-restriction-study-contradicts-earlier-results

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